Author Archive

May 6, 2012

PUPPET PARADE

by liumomo610

Puppet Parade is an interactive installation that allows children to use their arms to puppeteer larger than life creatures projected on the wall in front of them. Children can also step in to the environment and interact with the puppets directly, petting them or creating food for them to eat. This dual interactive setup allows children to perform alongside the puppets, blurring the line between the ‘audience’ and the puppeteers and creating an endlessly playful dialogue between the children in the space and the children puppeteering the creatures.

 

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May 6, 2012

Cabinet de Curiosités – Zim And Zou

by liumomo610

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May 6, 2012

“FACETURE” Project by Phil Cuttance

by liumomo610

FACETURE Film, 2012.

The FACETURE film shows the whole process of making a FACETURE small vase; from the making of the mould to the casting of the piece.

The FACETURE project was created with the support of Creative New Zealand.

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May 6, 2012

WINGS – Dukno Yoon

by liumomo610

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“Movement and interactive relationship with the body has been the most important element throughout my body of work. However through these works, I also started to explore the mechanical structure as a form. Mechanical structure becomes the most enjoyable form to me as it becomes complex yet remains simple and coherent. “”The contrast between metal structural form and natural feather, together with the repetitive and whimsical movements of fragile wings, provokes the imagination and evolves the intimate relationship between work and viewer/wearer. “”Although the recent series, segmented wings have been focused on the formal challenge to engineer an intricate movement that simulates bird wings, these works are intended to be a series of poems in which I develope my own formal language, interpret the nature of wings, create various structural forms with movements, and share the metaphor, imagination, humor, with viewer/wearer.”

 

May 6, 2012

Landscape Light Sculptures

by liumomo610

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Artist Barry Underwood photographs wonderfully mysterious light installations that he installs on-site in forests, mountainsides, or near lakes and rivers. Via his artist statement:

By reading the landscape and altering the vista through lights and photographic effects, I transform everyday scenes into unique images. Light and color alter the perception of space, while defamiliarizing common objects. Space collapses, while the lights that I install appear as intrusions and interventions. This combination renders the forms in the landscape abstract. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. They suggest a larger narrative, and yet that narrative remains elusive and mystifying.

May 6, 2012

Robert Howsare’s Drawing Apparatus

by liumomo610

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May 6, 2012

Yasuaki Onishi – reverse of volume

by liumomo610

In his installation, reverse of volume RGYasuaki Onishi uses the simplest materials — plastic sheeting and black hot glue — to create a monumental, mountainous form that appears to float in space. The process that he calls “casting the invisible” involves draping the plastic sheeting over stacked cardboard boxes, which are then removed to leave only their impressions. This process of “reversing” sculpture is Onishi’s meditation on the nature of the negative space, or void, left behind.

Onishi wanted to create an installation that would change as visitors approached and viewed it from outside of the glass wall to inside the gallery space. Seen through the glass, the undulating, exterior surface and dense layers of vertical black strands are primarily visible. At first glance, standing in the center of the gallery’s foyer, it appears to be a suspended, glowing mass whose exact depth is difficult to perceive. Upon entering the gallery and walking along the left or the right side, the installation transforms into an airy opening that can be entered. Almost like stepping into an inner sanctum or cave-like chamber, the semi-translucent plastic sheeting and wispy strands of hot glue envelop the viewer in a fragile, tent-like enclosure speckled with inky black marks. Visitors can walk in and out of the contemplative space, observing how the simplest qualities of light, shape, and line change.

 

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May 6, 2012

KARIMOKU NEW STANDARD prototypes at Milan Design Week 2012

by liumomo610

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May 6, 2012

collective works – mischertraxler

by liumomo610

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This project was initially developed for the ‘W-hotels designer of the Future award’ exhibition at Design Miami/Basel 2011.

‘Collective works’ is a production process which is just fully functioning when people pay attention to the producing machine. Reacting to its audience, the process translates the flow of people into an object. The resulting outcome varies in colour and size just like the level of interest is varying during the time of production.
As soon as one person is coming close and looks at the machine, the production process is started: A wooden 24mm wide veneer-strip is pulled through a glue basin and slowly coiled up around a 20mm thick wooden base. Since the turning platform with the base moves downwards the veneer strip slowly builds up a basket. Once a second person joins to look at the process, a light tone colour is added via a marker onto the veneer. The more people come to look at the machine, the more markers are activated, each with a gradient darker tone. This goes up to four markers, at the same time, staining the veneer-strip black. 

The interaction is possible due to sensors in the frame of the machine which detect the audience.Depending on the overall interaction time the baskets’ height is defined. The more often somebody stops by to watch the process the higher the outcome gets. 

The machine directly reacts to each observer and thus the outcome is as well directly depending on the audience. Every spectator leaves a mark on the object and therefore each basket becomes an unique record of the people’s interest in the object’s production. A basket – a vessel used to collect something becomes a collection of data by itself. If nobody is interested in the project, it stops producing at all and the final object just does not get made. This can be seen as ‘production on interest’.

‘Collective works’ also questions the relation between man and machine. The audience is turned into workers even tough their effort is basically just their time they spend with the machine – but time is what most of us lack. Somehow. Normally many machines in factories just need some technician to monitor the production and suddenly one machine needs some audience to produce colourful, vivid outcomes.

May 6, 2012

Long Modified Bench Auckland – Jeppe Hein

by liumomo610

A series of different bench designs is connected to an imaginary line of benches running along the building, on the terrace at the rooftop, the facade and inside the galleries.In some places the bench sinks into the ground, gently ascending elsewhere, sometimes providing an opportunity to take a seat and relax, sometimes only offering a sculptural impression.

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Year: 2011 
Materials: Powder-coated aluminium and LED 
Dimensions Variable
Permanent exhibition at Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tamaki, NZ, 2011