Author Archive

May 2, 2012

Yet another post on technique and choice of medium

by siddharth1989

While watching those Picasso videos we were shown in class, I was reminded of an artist I have come to adore.

If you can, you should check this out. (slightly morbid, I confess)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6Y5hiIGrUY&feature=related

Here’s the artist speaking of his process.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_UphwAfjhk

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May 2, 2012

On an artist’s choice of medium

by siddharth1989

Tacita Dean speaks of why she chose film over digital, how her choice is not idiosyncratic (or nostalgic) at all. To me it speaks a great deal about how the interaction between medium and artist shapes her creative process.

May 2, 2012

To those who find illustrated story books written for children fascinating

by siddharth1989

Some books by literary heavy weights written for children. 

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/07/19/7-childrens-books-by-adult-literature-authors/

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/07/25/childrens-books-by-adult-authors-2/

I just read Haroun and the Sea of Stories, and I recommend it to children all ages 🙂
 
 
May 2, 2012

A look at digital craft technologies

by siddharth1989

Craft+Automation+3D Printing=Better looking cakes?

“What happens when people who write code talk to people who bake cookies?”

Very interesting read on an industry that is bound to turn open-source sometime soon, from it’s current proprietary foundations.

Also, this gives a more comprehensive list of digital crafting technologies.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/03/technology/personaltech/03CRAFTS.html

May 1, 2012

Art and Neuroscience: A cautionary note

by siddharth1989

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/art-and-the-limits-of-neuroscience/

I’ve been posting here a bit too often about art and neuroscience explanations that seek biological reasons for our “preferences” when it comes to works of art.

Some preferences can indeed be accounted for by the way our brains work, and our evolutionary histories.

But the context in which art is experienced is far too complex a variable not fully dealt with by the current neuro-model. The author, a philosopher, pleads for a more holistic approach in this article.

April 30, 2012

How Poe came up with “The Raven”

by siddharth1989

How Poe came up with “The Raven”

His arguments and insights into the creative process are rather keen (slightly cold-blooded). 

April 30, 2012

The left and the right halves of the brain – Say what?

by siddharth1989

Revelatory. Visually brilliant.

April 30, 2012

About the theories of multiple intelligences

by siddharth1989

A more holistic approach towards human capabilities, rather more comprehensive than reducing our intelligence to a single number (i.e IQ, which to me seems rather too focused on verbal and arithmetic skills (of course the Raven’s test seems bit more comprehensive but still.) )

April 29, 2012

Study about imitation and originality in art

by siddharth1989

A neuro-science approach to the problem. The results are not surprising. The study takes Rembrandt’s art, and modern viewers’ evaluations, as a case in point.

“The first thing the researchers discovered is that there was no detectable difference in the response of visual areas to Rembrandt and “school of Rembrandt” works of art.

The findings support the idea that when people make aesthetic judgements, they are subject to a variety of influences. Not all of these are immediately articulated. Indeed, some may be inaccessible to direct introspection but their presence might be revealed by brain imaging. It suggests that different regions of the brain interact together when a complex judgment is formed, rather than there being a single area of the brain that deals with aesthetic judgements.”

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/12/how-does-the-brain-perceive-art/

April 29, 2012

Interesting revelations about brainstorming

by siddharth1989

Brainstorming has always been considered as a creativity enhancing tactic by most . This link explains how this might not really be the case. (An extract from an interesting book about the topic).

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/01/30/120130fa_fact_lehrer